Fangirling About Fan Art

A while back I made a post about Words as Art.  That post and the pictures in it were partially my inspiration for a project I’m doing in Digital Studies.  We have to take something (Anything – a book, a video game, etc.) and use some sort of computer tool to interpret that text.  I decided to do something with Pride & Prejudice, not only because it is one of my favorite books, but also because it is one I know really well, and because it is in the public domain.  What I decided to do was make various word clouds from chapters of the book.  I’ve already finished all the word clouds, and I will be making a separate page about the project. So for now, I’ll just give you a glimpse:

Screen shot 2013-10-18 at 9.09.12 PM

I think it’s turning out really well, and I’m excited to post the final product.

At any rate, I recently came upon another piece of words as art and thought I’d share it.  I mentioned before that I watched The Lizzie Bennet Diaries and I follow most of the actors from that show on Twitter.  While I’m a huge fan of the LBD, I haven’t quite morphed into the fan who makes fan art.  That isn’t to say I have anything against fan art – in a lot of instances, I think it is the coolest thing.  Myself, I have never really wanted to make fan art, but I really appreciate the effort fans put into making something beautiful and creative.  And in all honesty, what is my Digital Studies project if not fan art of Jane Austen’s classic novel?

Anyways, Ashley Clem, who played Lizzie Bennet, recently retweeted a piece of fan art someone (@FearFlannery) had created and tweeted at her.

(Click on the picture to see the original Tweet)

This picture is inspired by Episode 87: “An Understanding.” I won’t go into the details, but it is truly one of the best instances of acting I have ever seen.  The other inspiration for this picture is the song “No One is Alone” from the musical Into the Woods.

The marriage between these two shows is perfectly exemplified in this picture.  The lyrics from the song make up the tree, and in the foreground is Lizzie comforting her younger sister, Lydia, telling her that she is not alone.  This song and this episode both have the same underlying message; no one is alone.  To see them united so perfectly in this interpretation, really illustrates how fan art can add so much to the reading of any text.

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One thought on “Fangirling About Fan Art

  1. The title of your blog entry grabbed by attention because of my familiarity with fan art. I think fan art is rather unavoidable today, because it’s around all the social media sites, yet it’s not something that is brought up in an academic setting.

    Fan art (work), however, like you addressed, is about passion for a subject and reflects an understanding of what the maker interprets or how they want to interpret the canon. In the case of your text analysis, it lends to the interpretation of Pride and Prejudice with a closer reading of the words. The visual of The Lizzie Bennet Diaries reflects what the artist feels and lends itself to the viewers continued interpretation of the canon.

    In other words, what I’m trying to say is that text analysis is made of the original material, but the fan art is freely thought out, freely made, and reflects the passion of the maker. And I really like how you’ve shed some light on this topic of just how beautiful these interpretations can be.

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